HOW DOES COPAXONE® WORK?

COPAXONE® (glatiramer acetate injection) is used to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). It is an injection made with glatiramer acetate, which is thought to act by modifying immune processes that are believed to be responsible for the pathogenesis of MS. Patients taking COPAXONE® may see results in 12 months.

HOW RELAPSING MS AFFECTS YOUR BODY

  • Relapsing MS is most commonly known for affecting the central nervous system (CNS), which is made up of the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves. The CNS is affected through an abnormal response of the body's immune system.2

  • The immune system is made up of a network of cells, tissues, and proteins. There are many types of cells that play a part in the body’s immune response, one of which is called a T cell. In relapsing MS, inflammatory T cells attack the myelin that protects the nerve tissue in the CNS.2,3

COPAXONE® AND YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM

  • COPAXONE® is thought to modify immune processes believed to be responsible for activating MS. Therapies approved to treat relapsing MS, as well as treatments currently being studied, are thought to have an impact on the immune system. Because COPAXONE® is thought to modify the immune system, it may interfere with immune functions. There is no evidence that COPAXONE® reduces the body's normal immune response, but this has not been systematically evaluated.1,4,5

MS THERAPY AND IMMUNOSENESCENCE

  • Managing your MS is more than choosing a therapy that works today. As you age, immunosenescence (the aging of your immune system) should be considered—it can increase your risks for other serious conditions. That’s why managing your MS with a therapy that’s right for you is so important.6


Consider the results of 3-times-a-week COPAXONE® 40 mg, studied in the largest pivotal trial ever conducted for COPAXONE®.1

  • Primary study results: COPAXONE® 40 mg reduced the number of relapses compared with placebo (an inactive substance) at 12 months.

34% fewer. 34 %

Fewer relapses compared with placebo1

Relapses, also called flare-ups or attacks, can cause new symptoms to occur and make old symptoms worse.7

Relapses, also called flare-ups or attacks, can cause new symptoms to occur and make old symptoms worse.6

  • Secondary study results: COPAXONE® 40 mg showed a significant reduction in the underlying disease activity as measured by brain lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over 12 months compared with placebo.1,8

45% reduction. 45 %

Reduction in the total number of enhancing lesions on T1-weighted images1,8

T1-enhancing lesions, also known as gadolinium-enhancing T1 lesions, show areas where brain tissue is currently inflamed.9

T1-enhancing lesions, also known as gadolinium-enhancing T1 lesions, show areas where brain tissue is currently inflamed.9

35% reduction. 35 %

Reduction in the total number of new and enlarging T2 lesions1,8

T2 lesions show areas where the brain tissue has been damaged.9

T2 lesions show areas where the brain tissue has been damaged.9

COPAXONE® STUDIED ACROSS 5 CLINICAL TRIALS1

Daily COPAXONE® 20 mg. 3‐times‐a‐week COPAXONE® 40 mg

 

For more about how COPAXONE® treats MS, visit our educational resources.

References:

  1. COPAXONE® (glatiramer acetate injection) Current Prescribing Information Parsippany, NJ. Teva Neuroscience, Inc.

  2. Definition of MS. National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS). Accessed November 18, 2018. https://www.nationalmssociety.org/What-is-MS/Definition-ofMS

  3. What is an immune mediated disease? National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS). Accessed November 18, 2018. https://www.nationalmssociety.org/What-is-MS/Definition-of-MS/Immune-mediated-disease

  4. Bennett JL, Stüve 0. Update on inflammation, neurodegeneration, and immunoregulation in multiple sclerosis: therapeutic implications. Clin Neuropharmacol. 2009;32(3):121-132.

  5. Balashov K. Drugs in development for multiple sclerosis. Practical Neurology. Accessed July 13, 2021. https://practicalneurology.com/articles/2020-feb/drugs-in-development-for-multiple-sclerosis

  6. Goronzy JJ, Weyand CM. Understanding immune senescence to improve vaccine responses. Nat Immunol. 2013;14(5):428-436. 

  7. Managing relapses. National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS). Accessed November 18, 2018. https://www.nationalmssociety.org/Treating-MS/ManagingRelapses

  8. Khan O, Rieckmann P, Boyko A, Selmaj K, Zivadinov R; for the GALA Study Group. Three times weekly glatiramer acetate in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Ann Neural. 2013;73(6):705-713. 

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS). Accessed November 18, 2018. https://www.nationalmssociety.org/Symptoms-Diagnosis/Diagnosing-Tools/MRI

  10. Bornstein MB, Miller A, Slagle S, et al. A pilot trial of Cop 1 in exacerbating-remitting multiple sclerosis. N Engl J Med. 1987;317(7):408-414.

  11. Johnson KP, Brooks BR, Cohen JA, et al. Copolymer 1 reduces relapse rate and improves disability in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: results of a phase 111 multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Neurology. 1995;45(7): 1268-1276.

  12. Comi G, Filippi M, Wolinsky JS; and the European/Canadian Glatiramer Acetate Study Group. European/Canadian multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study of the effects of glatiramer acetate on magnetic resonance imaging-measured disease activity and burden in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis. Ann Neurol. 2001;49(3):290-297.

  13. Comi G, Martinelli V, Rodegher M, et al. Effect of glatiramer acetate on conversion to clinically definite multiple sclerosis in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (PreCISe study): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Lancet. 2009;374(9700):1503-1511.

  14. US Department of Health and Human Services. Supplement approval. Accessed November 18, 2018. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/appletter/2009/020622s057ltr.pdf

  15. US Department of Health and Human Services. Supplement approval. Accessed November 18, 2018. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/appletter /2014/020622Orig1s089ltr.pdf

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